Archive for the Current YEAR Race Results Category

December 1, 2018 – Time Trial Championship / Commodores Cup – Mount Beckworth 37.5 Km

December 1, 2018 – Time Trial Championship / Commodores Cup – Mount Beckworth 37.5 Km

Race Against The Clock – 1 December 2018

Time Trial Championship /
Commodores Cup

Mount Beckworth short circuit, 37.5 km

EVCC 2018 break up - slide

100% effort

“It’s the race of truth”
-Paul Sherwen

ARRIVAL OF THE TRIATHLETES
ELLIS – SUBLIME IN TIME TRIAL VICTORY
GOODALL – TROPHY VICTORY AT SECOND RACE
CHAOS AT THE START LINE

EUREKA Cycling closed out the 10th anniversary year with the inaugural Club Time Trial Championship.  In keeping with recent tradition, the Commodores Cup was also awarded at the final race.
Fastest times decided the TT Championship.
Handicap times decided the Commodores Cup.

The idea for a Club Time Trial Championship was provided by Matt Bowman back in 2017.  Including the Commodores Cup in the day ensured that every rider would be racing for a prize and not just those riders with time trial specific bikes, or worse still…triathletes…

Eighteen riders started in the first Time Trial the club has ever staged.  A strong wind was blowing from the north and everyone was mentally preparing themselves for an absolute smashfest.  Riders would start at one minute intervals.
For many, it would be their first ever Time Trial of any description.
Expectation weighed heavily on a few riders – Craig Lee; Matt Bowman and Rob Ellis were the favourites to stand on the podium.  All three would be mounted on pure Time Trial steeds…

To the start line and Brian Ure started off proceedings at 10:00 AM.  Ure sits a little taller than most riders.  He caught a lot of wind today on his road bike.
Emma Goodall was away next, in just her second ever race with Eureka.  Goodall has a triathlon background and was riding a top of the line machine, weighed downed to ensure the wind didn’t blow her off course.
One of the favourites – Rob Ellis – was all nerves before the event.  His anticipation of the hurt he was about to endure had he sweating.  Unlike a triathlon, he didn’t need to save his legs for the run leg…  At the start line he pressed the “mental mode” button and was off.
Dan Whelan was the fourth rider out on the road.  Whelan accepted that his beard would act like a windsock and slow him down.  He’d just ride harder on his road bike…
Ash Burke was hopeful of a lull in the wind as he rode out for his first ever Time Trial.  He didn’t get it, however he did get smashed on his road bike!
Stuart Brien brought experience from the Ironman 70.3 staged in Ballarat a few years ago.  Brien rode the Time Trial leg in the team’s event back then without any aero aids…it would be the same on this day.
The outright favourite for the day was Craig Lee (former triathlete).  He rolled up to the start line on his TT machine (complete with rear disc wheel) only to be told by the assistant starters that he had a flat front tyre.  Lee moved aside.  Matt Bowman offered a spare wheel.  Could it be delivered to Lee in time to start at the end of the list?
Dean Wells was next away – with a regular road bike and clip on bars.  Would his recent time trial practise help his cause?
Bob Morley had a harrowing experience just one week and a half earlier.  Blown off the road by a truck whilst trialling clip on bars, Morley fell back onto the road and was lucky not to be struck.  Chatty as ever at the start line, Morley’s witty commentary belied his nerves.
Roger McMillan was next away – regular road bike and tattoo sleeves to protect himself from the sun didn’t look weird…
Phil McLennan was looking forward to getting his large frame out on the road.  He wondered pre-race just how much more this would hurt than cross country running.
Another of the favourites – Matt Bowman – was next on the start line.  The man in black had a race plan to help him on the long climb.  Coming back would suit his power abilities!
Greg Ley was on his shiny new TT bike and certainly looking the business.  Could he deliver in front of his personal cheer squad?
Peter Canny rolled up on his road bike and proclaimed that the wind was definitely stronger according to his anemometer.  Everyone just looked at him.
Next to set off was Jason Hendry.  It’s hard for the taller riders to make an effective aerodynamic shape – Hendry made it look awkward as well.
Chris Chatham is another new rider and another triathlete on a triathlon TT rig.  Chatham is impervious to the pain he inflicts on himself and was champing at the bit to get out into the wind.
Craig Lightfoot was a late entry.  Lacking race fitness due to a minor procedure (removal of bolt from knee), Lightfoot found a suitable replacement for his corner marshal duties and rocked up to the start in anticipation of failing again.  Failing to make a podium in any race during 2018 was within his grasp…
Last away was Craig Lee after getting the replacement front wheel.  With the field before him, Lee’s bid to claim another Champion sash was in his own control…

Let us just assume that there were varying degrees of pain felt during the Time Trial.

Post race, all riders were unanimous in their enjoyment of the final seventeen kilometres…the downhill bit…with the tail wind…

Fastest on this day was Rob Ellis.  He denied Craig Lee by just 23 seconds! Matt Bowman was third fastest, just 62 seconds behind Ellis.
It was a long gap to the next riders.  Dean Wells was fourth fastest, just a handful of seconds later was Greg Ley, with a similar margin to Stuart Brien.

After the handicaps were applied, the winner of the Commodores Cup was Emma Goodall.

Club TT Championship (actual time): 37.5 Km
0:54:41, 41.1 kph – Robert Ellis
0:55:04, 40.8 kph – Craig Lee
0:55:44, 40.4 kph – Matt Bowman
1:00:17, 37.3 kph – Dean Wells
1:00:24, 37.3 kph – Greg Ley
1:00:31, 37.2 kph – Stuart Brien
1:02:50, 35.8 kph – Jason Hendry
1:03:45, 35.3 kph – Chris Chatham
1:03:53, 35.2 kph – Peter Canny
1:04:58, 34.6 kph – Craig Lightfoot
1:06:39, 33.8 kph – Danny Whelan
1:07:34, 33.3 kph – Bob Morley
1:07:53, 33.1 kph – Emma Goodall
1:08:35, 32.8 kph – Brian Ure
1:10:24, 31.9 kph – Peter Livitsanis
1:10:36, 31.8 kph – Phillip McLennan
1:10:56, 31.7 kph – Ashley Burke
1:11:40, 31.4 kph – Roger McMillan
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Commodores Cup (timers adjusted for handicap marks):
1st – Emma Goodall
2nd – Rob Ellis
3rd – Matt Bowman
4th – Dean Wells
5th – Craig Lee
6th – Greg Ley
7th – Stu Brien
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 EVCC 2018 break up - poster

November 11, 2018 – Eureka Club Championships Day – graded divisions

November 11, 2018 – Eureka Club Championships Day – graded divisions

Ken Heres ROAD RACE Championships Day
11 November, 2018

graded divisions

Mount Beckworth circuit – 69 km
Coghill’s Creek circuit – 63 km

 EVCC 2018 Championships Day - poster

Armistice Day Centenary

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old.
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.”

The 2018 Eureka Cycling Road Race Championships Day was conducted on Sunday 11th November – 100 years on from Armistice Day 1918.
The sacrifices by people on all sides of the conflict known as World War 1 have shaped much of modern society.
We are privileged to ride our bicycles in a country devoid of the devastating conflict which they knew, lived and fought.

Lest we forget.

2018 Eureka Championship Race

Seventeen riders signed on the 2018 Eureka Championship Race.  It was a star studded field with no less than four previous Club Champions.
2017 Champion Tim Canny was aiming for back to back victories.  That feat has not been achieved so far in the ten year history of Eureka.

The 2018 Championships had been moved away from the traditional Weatherboard circuit due to 100 year commemorations of Armistice day.  The course for the Championship race was newly designed especially for the event and included two laps of the Mount Beckworth circuit.
And so, the scene was set.

The man with the “blingiest” bike was Matt Ayres.  With his shiny blue bike and attired in a skinsuit, Ayres resembled a Power Ranger. Unfortunately he lacked any power today as the battery on his bike was flat…such is life in a modern world…a true disappointment for the race, as Ayres would have more than held his own with the way events transpired!

The circuit itself was sun drenched and the day promised to be most suitable for racing in summer kit.  The Championship set off last and the field of sixteen rolled out at an easy pace.
Riders were happy to gradually build up speed and warm up enroute to glory.  Turning onto Coghill’s Creek Road for the first time and finally some action was seen.  The pace ramped up considerably with the slight tail wind and the race favourites moved towards the front.  Canny was swapping turns with Craig Lee, Rob Ellis and Dave Ogilvie.  The rest were happy to let them do the work, however Cameron Farrington did roll through for a few turns as well.
Ogilvie tried shaking things up, which only awakened Matt Bowman and he charged through and off the front for a brief period.

Through Coghill’s Creek and the long climb to Mount Beckworth commenced.  Most riders had already committed to a day of self preservation.  They knew that every ounce of energy would be required when the attacks commenced.

CC6

Canny and Ellis were doing the most work heading past the winery.  Dean Wells joined in the rotations.  Everyone else seemed to be waiting.

Past the Glendaurel CFA station and the field was still as one.  Tensions mounted as those expecting a shellacking on the day tried to edge forward.

Finally the attack came and it quickly split the field.  Lee and Ogilvie launched, Canny chased the wheels and everyone scrambled as one.
To the turnaround and the field was stretched out.  Stuart Brien bridged the gap and towed a handful of riders along with him.  The race regrouped on the way back down to Glendaurel and the field was in single file as they headed back into the light headwind.

The race remained this way as it rejoined the Coghill’s Creek circuit.  Through the chicane and into Donovan’s Road there was the odd quickening of pace, however the size of the field helped keep everyone together.
Greg Ley rolled through to the front and took up rotations with Canny, Ellis and Lee.  The rest of the field were happy with this situation and the status quo remained through the start/finish line for the end of lap one.  Canny accelerated out of the “highway corner” and tried to create a break, which was quickly shut down.
Tony Mirabella tried to go off the front a few times, however the conditions were not suitable for a breakaway and any effort off the front was easily covered.

Through Blowhard and Jason Birch moved forward with Tavis Baker to ensure they were present for the next round of attacks.  No attacks eventuated.

Through Coghill’s Creek and Canny was back on the front with Wells acting as chaperone.  Brendan Schiemer edged forward as the road started to turn up, however it was Canny on the front and there he stayed for kilometre after kilometre.
Ley, then Mirabella rolled through to the front as the climb proper commenced.  The pace started to pick up and riders started edging their way forward.  Andrew Rushton moved up towards the front as the field compressed.

Eventually an attack came…
Ogilvie and Lee the protagonists, then Canny over the top.  
The attack was once again covered and through the turnaround the peace had returned.  Rick Calvert rolled through to the lead on the downhill and made himself present for a very long time – often off the front.
Canny was soon at the front again with Wells on his wheel.

The race was still together and it looked destined to finish in a sprint finish due to the light breeze and lack of attacking opportunities.
Nearing the chicane Ogilvie launched an attack which had riders scrambling, however it was shut down soon into Donovan’s Road.
Jason Hendry rolled up towards the front as the race entered the final few kilometres.

Coming to the crest on Donovan’s Road and the pace had slowed.  Ogilvie on the front, Hendry behind him.  Canny and Lee close by.  Birch and Rushton filling the front rank.
The road was blocked and the race edged closer to the finish.  Calls to “hold your line, hold your line” echoed around the bunch.  Fourteen riders in such a small space was making everyone nervous.

The final four hundred metres and the pace was only slowly creeping up.
At two fifty metres there was some twitching and Wells exploded out of the pack.  Canny and Lee launched on cue.  For a moment, others seemed flatfooted.
One hundred metres out and Wells was having delusions of grandeur…
Lee was the first to sweep past with Canny hot on his heels.

CC9  CC10  CC11

Into the dying metres and Lee has the advantage, he will be the new Club Champion ahead of a gallant Canny.
Hendy finishes fast to snare third place and Birch finally sees daylight and emerges from the pack for fourth at the line ahead of Wells.  The rest a blur of coloured lycra.

Results:
1st – Craig Lee
2nd – Tim Canny
3rd – Jason Hendry
4th – Jason Birch
5th – Dean Wells

Super Vets Championship

The field for the new category, Super Vets, was small, but heaving with talent.  63 kilometres awited them – three laps of the Coghill’s Creek circuit.

Australian representatives, fresh back from Italy, were Bob Braszell and Lindsay Burgoyne – both star inclusions.
Rob Phillips, the current Eureka Open, winner was installed as the early favourite.
Peter Canny was there and he has been winning most races he starts in.
Rounding out the field was the relentless Danny Whelan and Bob Morley who was making up the numbers.

All riders were concerned about what Burgoyne would do.  They didn’t have to wait long as he took his rightful place on the front and proceeded to test the field.
Phillips was on his wheel and was determined if Burgoyne was going to get away he would have company.
Burgoyne predictably attacked on the quarry road hill to see what the rest of them were made of.
Phillips went around him at the top to add to the angst.  The field stayed on.

Around the corner they went and Burgoyne went to the front again.  Two more corners and into the Donovan’s Road Hill they went.
Predictably, Burgoyne attacked again.
Everybody covered the move and he was starting to think that this might be a difficult task.

Into quarry hill road (aka Sulky Road) Burgoyne attacked again.  Again, no one was off the back.

So all together into the last lap and Burgoyne decided that he would settle onto the back of the bunch and there he stayed.

The bunch was rolling along and all were wondering what is Lindsay up to?  Up the Donovan’s Road pinch all were waiting for him to come off the back.  He didn’t.
What was Lindsay up to?  

Rolling down Donovan’s Road the pace came off the race considerably.
It got so slow that they would not have been surprised if either the “auto pause” function kicked in on their Garmins, or their pacemakers gave them a jolt…

Two kilometres to go and Lindsay was still on the back.  What was he up to?

Canny was on the front and kept looking back waiting for the attack off the back.  It didn’t come.
Whelan couldn’t stand going so slow and went to the front and picked up the pace but it was still a pretty gentle clip.

The whole field got to 250 metres out and Canny got sick of waiting for the Burgoyne tilt and hit out for the finish.
Phillips used his strength and acceleration – went to the lead and took a comfortable victory.  Canny held off a fast finishing Bob Morley to take second place.

They are still wondering what Lindsay Burgoyne was up to.  Not much it seems…

Results:
1st – Rob Phillips
2nd – Peter Canny
3rd – Bob Morley

Division 2 Championship

Today we express our freedom and friendship with our fellow riders.  Well that was before the race began.

Ten started the Division 2 Championship on this Remembrance day.
Peter Livitsanis was the first to attack – into the first corner, fast and furious like the air venting from his tyre – another flat for Livi…

Now nine remained – to go hard.
They stayed together for the first lap.
The pace was up a bit on the second lap.

An Unknown Rider was up the road…was it Tim Tyler, was it Riachrd Kennedy?

As the race came towards the finish line, Jeremy Humber gave chase of the break.  A huge effort, followed by an all out sprint to “win” lap number two…
Humber’s reward for effort?  Hearing the bell toll to announce the last lap…
The miscount had cost Humber dearly, he was spent and out of the race soon after.

Eight remained for the fight.
Craig Lightfoot and Ash Burke were hatching plans for a counter attack.  When would they deliver?

Hurtling past the quarry and towards the hill in a charge which would have done a mounted brigade proud.
Except no Ralph Jones (James Gretton), the cannon was gone, what better man to blast through a head wind?
Seven remained.

Into the final stages the bunch dropped the pace getting ready for desert storm.  All guns locked and loaded.  Sights set on victory ahead.
The wind up to top speed was an effort.

Peter Gunston led the squadron home – caution to the wind – attacking like a kamikaze pilot and driving it home to victory.
Steve Linane was like a Spitfire – guns blazing, then all ammo spent.  Then in the final moments the Red Barron like Roger McMillan swoops in to snatch away second prize.

Results:
1st – Peter Gunston
2nd – Roger McMillan
3rd – Steve Linane


Division 3 Championship

The opening lap was ridden with caution, no rider willing to expose their hand this early in the race.

The pace started to move along on at start the second lap exposing Bill Dwyer by mid lap.  The remaining riders worked their longish turns, Jakki Dawson appreciating the shelter behind the bigger men.

Lap three and big Phil McLennan stated to assert his strength, putting pressure on the other riders.
Pulling massive strong, long, turns, was he doing too much too soon? 

Coming into Donovan’s the last time the group slowed, strategy and gamesmanship came into play.
Rob Parker was left dangling of the front, the other’s happy to approach the finish with caution.

Over the rise a few hundred metres and Phil made his play, launching a strong long range sprint.
Parker and Dawson responded, but neither were able to make any head way into the lead McLennan had established.  McLennan riding away to a comfortable and well deserved victory.  Parker struggled into second, with Dawson capping off a strong race with third.

Results:
1st – Phil McLennan
2nd – Rob Parker
3rd – Jakkii Dawson

EVCC 2018 Champions

November 19, 2017 – Championships Day, scratch racing – Weatherboard

November 19, 2017 – Championships Day, scratch racing – Weatherboard

EUREKA CYCLING
ROAD RACE

Championships

Ken Heres Bobcat & Backhoe Hire

19 November 2017

EVCC 2017 road race Championships - poster

Weatherboard circuit

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Race morning presented and riders travelled from near and far to contest the Eureka Cycling ROAD RACE Championships.
Glorious sunshine bathed Learmonth, yet a fierce north east breeze was present and the racers knew they were in for a hard day at the office, especially as the temperature was predicted to rise into the 20’s.

Much conjecture over who would race each division was had during the week…rumours had spread that certain riders would not be present…others issued challenges to their nemesis….alliances were formed…social media fuelled speculation and various scenarios were discussed.

At the sign in desk the numbers grew for the Championship race and the Division 2 race, yet entries were light for the Division 3 race.
The officials planned the day, the marshals collected their gear, the kitchen prepared the food, the riders warmed up…the stage was set…three championship races run concurrently…three stories to be told…

Division 3

Consisting of just three riders – John Faulkner, Graeme Parker and Rob Young – the Division 3 championship race was over 50 kilometres and the wind would have much to say about who would survive.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
A silent gentleman’s agreement was had and the trio set off to engage the circuit.  Work together, defeat the circuit, sprint for the prize, may the best man win.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Faulkner lasted for 35 kilometres before the elastic broke, leaving just Parker and Young out on the road.  Swapping turns, yet being wary not to over exert, the cat and mouse began.
Whilst Faulkner pulled up at 40 km and put the cue in the rack – so to speak – Parker and Young started the mind games.  Parker surged down Weatherboard road towards the chicane and attempted to unsettle Young, yet the challenge was matched.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A sprint would decide the medals and each was wary not to give anything away.

Through the final turn and just 1500 metres to decide the champion.  Onto the hill and they raced side by side, over the crest and Parker edged just a little ahead then unleashed his sprint.  A blink of an eye and the contest is over, Parker raced away to the win and Young crossed a few seconds later, gallant as ever.

IMG_1176

Result Division 3 Championship, 50 km:
1st – Graeme Parker
2nd – Robert Young

Division 2

The 60 kilometres race saw one of the larger fields ever assembled to contest for the Division 2 Championship medals.  A few riders were backing up after competing in the Misery 100 race staged by Ballarat Sebastopol CC on the previous day.  Others had set their sights on the event weeks before and planned meticulously for the event and yet others had emerged from the veritable cycling wilderness to compete or literally through their hand up to race in a higher grade…
At the start line thirteen amassed – Jim Burzacott, Terry Collie, James Gretton, Jason Hendry, Jeremy Humber, Jude Jonasson, James Knipe, Kevin Lee, Phil McLennan, Roger McMillan, Bob Morley, Brian Ure and Dan Whelan – then set off in search of victory.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The wind decided much of the day’s play as riders jockeyed for wheels and hiding in the pack was a much desired tactic.  Early in the race the likes of Whelan, Humber, Knipe and Burzacott made much of the running.
Not many attacks would ensue, for the plan was to reduce the numbers by attrition.  Stay in the gutter and keep the pace strong…  McLennan was an early casualty and others were seen to yoyo off the back as the halfway mark approached.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Rarely on the front at this early stage, yet always within striking distance were the experienced Collie, Morley and Gretton.  Others remained hidden, yet ready to chase as required.
The race wore on, yet the dozen remained intact and bar for sporadic quickenings through the chicane the race was nullified to the point that a sprint finish seemed inevitable.  McMillan had placed himself comfortably in the rear half of the field and noted how easy Ure was coping with the race.  This was a man to follow!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The bell lap and by now the stronger riders were worried that to attack would leave them exposed to those whom had stayed relatively hidden throughout proceedings.

Ure casually rode off the front over Weatherboard and opened a small gap down towards the chicane.  Gretton (who is at one with gravity) followed and crossed the space to Ure who was now in full fledged attack mode.  They quickly opened the lead to over 200 metres.  Ure powered through the final turn with Gretton tucked in behind.  A quick glimpse over his shoulder gave him the confidence to launch early on the climb.  Be damned if there s a hill in the way!
The pack rounded the turn and riders jumped from wheel to wheel as they watched Ure and Gretton commence the climb – then in a moment Gretton has lost contact and Ure races away.  Could they close to Gretton?

Ure crested the Hendersons Road hill and has a clear margin.  The pack charge past Gretton on the climb and crest the hill.  Lungs and legs are bursting yet medals can be won and Ure is just ahead and racing to the line to claim victory.
McMillan has exploded out of the pack and races to second a few lengths ahead of Humber.  Morley appears to have fourth place sewn up until Collie ducks around and grabs it on the line.

IMG_1179

Result Division 2 Championship, 60 km:
1st – Brian Ure
2nd – Roger McMillan
3rd – Jeremy Humber
4th – Terry Collie
5th – Bob Morley

Championship Race

The feature event of the day was the Championship Race to decide whom would be crowned 2017 Club Champion and earn the right to wear the blue dossard emblazoned with the white phoenix during season 2018.
Sixteen of Eureka’s fastest riders signed on to ride in one of the largest fields yet assembled for the Championship race, almost half of them had ridden the Misery 100 the day before…would that be a factor?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A veritable who’s who of Eureka riders mounted for the fray – defending champion Greg Ley, Matt Ayres, Jason Birch, Matt Bowman, Bob Braszell, Stuart Brien, Rick Calvert, Peter Canny, Tim Canny, Peter Gunston, Craig Lee, Paul Pickersgill, Tony MIrabella, Rob Phillips, Brendan Schiemer and Richard Taylor – listened to the race referee’s instructions then set out in pursuit of glory…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The early laps were fast and Braszell and Phillips soon found themselves a tad off the pace.  Pickersgill, Calvert, Peter Canny and Gunston were also stretched and soon enough the field had been reduced to ten.  The dropped riders fought on in their ones and twos…sometimes closing the gap to the riders ahead, then watching the gap drift further apart and never rejoining.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The race for the ten remaining riders wore on.  No major attacks, yet plenty of pace and stretching of the elastic bands.  Seemingly from nowhere Tim Canny made an attack heading up Avenue Road with just under 30 kilometres remaining.  Timed to perfection – at the top of a rise and just as the road turns due north – Canny’s effort utilised the marginal cross headwind to maximise his effort and open a space.
The others looked left and right with no-one willing to commit to lead the chase.

IMG_1171

Out of the Avenue and Canny had not increased his margin, yet the bunch were not working to chase him down.  No one wanted to over exert with so far left to race.  Canny meanwhile was watching his watts as he crested Weatherboard.  He needed to conserve his effort with the tail wind without conceding too much ground.  Through the chicane and his lead is around 400 metres.  Birch leads the chase and with dare has shaved a few lengths off the gap as the bunch fly through.  He looks over his shoulder and realises he is in no mans land, the bunch has sat up…is the chase over already?
With barely a hint of organisation the “chase” bunch has been reduced to nine individuals intending to just survive.

IMG_1173

Over the Hendersons Road climb and they pass through the finish line with two laps remaining.  Canny is already heading up the Avenue, though with some teamwork they could possibly bring him back.
Survival trumps teamwork…they head up the Avenue and watch the distant Canny blend into the sea of greenery.

IMG_1182

Canny is racing away to possibly his first win in the Club Championship.  He watches the power meter and he remembers to drink.  The gap has been made, now to press the issue!  The bunch is no longer chasing.  They have consigned themselves to racing for the minor placings and a race within the race has developed.
One by one, individuals surge or make a short attack, all with the aim of wearing opponents down and it works as Bowman finds himself off the back.  Brien uses his skills to open a gap through the chicane.  The bunch respond and bring him back by the climb in Hendersons Road.  They crest the rise, receive the bell lap and have just ten kilometres to stake a claim on a medal.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mirabella is quite active over the next five kilometres – surging, easing, then surging again.  He has riders on their absolute limits, but they keep clawing back.

Ahead and Canny is time trialling his way to yet another famous victory.  The slightest of hiccups as he receives a red flag for a vehicle at the base of weatherboard – then away he goes again.  His gap is measurable in minutes…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Canny sweeps through the final bend when the bunch sweep through the chicane.  He takes the final ascent with ease and cruises to the finish where he is greeted by much applause – all hail the new Club Champion.

IMG_1183

The bunch take the final turn.  No-one wants to play their cards too early.  The sprinters are happy to be towed up the hill, but the slow twitch riders need to stretch it out into a grind.
Ley goes first early on the hill.  Lee is on his wheel in a flash and Birch is next.  Mirabella draws alongside Birch as they all overtake Ley.
Over the hill and Lee kicks, Birch can’t respond immediately but they have gapped everyone else.  Lee holds his gap to the line and claims second ahead of Birch.  Ayres rallies late to come through in fourth with Brien close behind in fifth.

IMG_1186

Championship race results, 70 km:
1st – Tim Canny
2nd – Craig Lee
3rd – Jason Birch
4th – Matt Ayres
5th – Stuart Brien

Thank you to all who made the day a success – referees, marshals, kitchen, spectators and of course the riders.

Photos L-R:

Tim Canny unpinning the Phoenix dossard from Greg Ley’s (Club Champion 2016) jersey.
Greg and Tim hamming up the handover of the dossard.
The Champions – Brian Ure (Division 2), Tim Canny (Club Champion), Graeme Parker (Division 3)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Page 7 of 71234567

Recent club racing

News

Recent Comments

    Race Archives

    Login Form